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In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date on their fantasy football teams. Some players may be available on your waiver wire, some may be available via a cheap or donnellmoderate trade. Acquiring or not acquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.  One of these players is taking the Twitter and fantasy-verse by storm, Larry Donnell.  He had his own hash tag trending this past Friday.  The other, quarterback Mike Glennon, was a surprise starter his rookie year and got demoted due to a coaching change before the start of 2014.  Here are my thoughts:

TE Larry Donnell, NYG- Perhaps one of this year’s biggest surprises is the second year Grambling walk-on to the Giants tight end (nfl.com reports he is in his second year and rotoworld.com states that he is in his third season).  Of course, every week I try to evaluate at least one player from the Thursday night game and Donnell exceeded all expectations.  His versatility playing inline tight end, full back, split out-wide, and as a wingback impressed me.  When you first look at him, the young tight end looks all tall and lanky, but his amazing catch radius does the talking.  Donnell caught passes at the ball highest point, in his stomach, off his hip, and right out in front of his body in stride. Read More »

In my weekly column, we take a long look at impact fantasy football rookies.  I compare their performance to date against my original expectations of them.  Let’s continue this 2014 version of the series by looking at one of the top ten rookie Benjamin-mini-camppicks in Carolina’s Kelvin Benjamin.  While this huge weapon has a lot of pluses, I have some doubts, too.

Here is what I saw in college from Benjamin: On the majority of his college catches, the receiver traps the ball with his body.  This limits his chances to gain additional yardage after the catch as well as more difficult for him to secure the ball leaving him more open to fumbles or drops.  When he does try to catch the ball with his hands, Benjamin spends a lot of time double catching the pigskin.  I’m not sure if this is a concentration issue or just his lack of fluidity.  It seems that he runs his routes deeper than the quarterback anticipates which causes the ball to either be intercepted or fall short. Read More »

In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date on their fantasy football teams. Some players may be available on your waiver wire, some may be available via a cheap or ballermoderate trade. Acquiring or not acquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.  This week I decided to watch the Denver Broncos second year running backs Montee Ball and CJ Anderson.  While this week’s second and third year player report may seem a little off for dynasty fantasy football league waiver wires, it has a bigger purpose.  These articles help find players that you might be willing to trade for before their values increase or decrease significantly. Read More »

In fantasy football, there are some new trends that I enjoy writing about: dynasty leagues, and individual defensive player leagues.  This weekly column will combine two of those by discussing two young IDPs.  I will give my scouting thoughts mackyon how they played a particular week.  Today I will be discussing the young Oakland Raider linebacker corps of third year player Miles Burris and rookie sensation Khalil Mack.  I had hoped to also write about Sio Moore who had an outstanding first week with eleven tackles, two forced fumbles, and a sack.  He, unfortunately suffered an ankle injury during the second game and was unable to play in week three.  These injuries ravaged their linebackers including middle linebacker Nick Roach, who has yet to play this season. Read More »

In my weekly column, we take a long look at impact fantasy football rookies.  I compare their performance to date against my original expectations of them.  Let’s continue this 2014 version of the series by looking at one of the top rookie picks inevans1 Tampa Bay’s Mike Evans.  You most likely spent a high rookie pick or a significant startup selection to get him on your roster.

Here is what I saw in college from the receiver: For the first moment you see him, it is clear that Evans is a big bodied, powerful, striding wide receiver at 6′ 5″ 225 lbs.  While he isn’t always a consistent hands catcher,  the young wide out adjusts well to the ball in the air. Evans has the body control to reach behind for a pass thrown at his hip in stride.  His concentration and athleticism make him a dangerous play maker.  Read More »

twestIn my weekly column, we take a long look at impact fantasy football rookies.  I compare their performance to date against my original expectations of them.  Let’s continue this 2014 version of the series by looking at the Browns dynamic rookie running back duo of 2014 third rounder Terrance West and free agent selection of Isaiah Crowell.

Here is what I saw in college from West: This runner saw a lot of carries playing for little Towson College finishing with over 4,800 rushing yards and 84 touchdowns in a three-year career. The rookie back runs with a lot of power and uses his pad level to inflict pain on the defense. West has good patience and vision combined with quick feet to get to the hole quickly. The young runner doesn’t create much room for himself, but he takes what the defense opens up. He is dependable as the day is long, but is not very flashy. The biggest knock against him is that he hasn’t played against great competition with a lot of touches, so much of his fate will rest on with which team drafts him. Read More »

In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date on their fantasy football teams. Some players may be available on your waiver wire, some may be available via a cheap or stacymoderate trade. Acquiring or not acquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.  This week I decided to watch the St. Louis Rams second year running backs Zach Stacy and Bennie Cunningham in action against Tampa Bay.  I own either Stacy, Cunningham, and/or Tre Mason in three leagues with a desire to understand what is going on. Read More »

The début of CBS Thursday Night Football featured two first round linebackers playing against each other from their college days into their now bitter rivalry in the AFC North.  In every single rookie or start-up IDP draft I participated in this cjmospring and summer, former Ohio State backer, Ryan Shazier, got drafted first.  Then perhaps a few picks later former Alabama backer, CJ Mosley, got selected. Each linebacker has a talented veteran anchoring the inside along with them in 3-4 defenses, giving the rookies more of a free flow to the ball with fewer responsibilities.  Let’s look at their performances against each other’s teams to get a better feel for their fantasy and NFL futures. Read More »

In my weekly column, we take a long look at impact fantasy football rookies.  I compare their performance to date against my original expectations of them.  Let’s start this 2014 version of the series by looking back at Brandin Cooks.cooks

Here is what I saw in college from Cooks: The diminutive former Oregon State receiver, 5′ 10″ 189 lbs., has a huge catch radius, possesses great stop/start agility, blazing 4.31 40 speed,  along with good downfield vision. I see a rare combination of Steve Smith (big and my ball mentality) and DeSean Jackson (smoothness with acrobatics) to his game.  Cooks uses his smaller stature to motivate himself and demand the ball like Smith and Jackson do.  He has a solid Read More »

In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date. Some players may be available on your waiver wire, some may be available via a cheap or moderate trade. Acquiring or not wheatonacquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.

Marcus Wheaton, WR, Pittsburgh Steelers

Wheaton, in his second year with the Steelers, was the main cog of the 2012 Oregon State offense with his 5′ 11″ and 182 lbs. frame. He spent most of his college career out of the slot a lot while carrying the ball on a few reverses. The wide receiver is very quick/agile and uses good angles to make the most out of his touches. Wheaton can climb the highest point to get to the ball and can catch those worm burners near the ground.  Due to injuries in his rookie year, the former Beaver receiver only received 13 targets his rookie year, catching six of them for 64 yards.  During the preseason, the chemistry between the second year wide out and Ben Roethlisberger seemed mixed.  The game against the Browns was their first test together. Read More »

In fantasy football, there are several new trends: daily leagues, dynasty leagues, and individual defensive player leagues.  This weekly column will combine two of those by discussing two young IDPs.  I will give my scouting thoughts on how they paulwplayed a particular week.  Today I will be discussing the young Atlanta Falcons linebacker core of second year Paul Worrilow, second year Joplo Bartu, and rookie Prince Shembo.

Paul Worrilow

During the preseason, I got drawn to the big play ability of Worrilow.  He sees the play as it is developing and flows well to attack the ball carrier.  In coverage, Worrilow is athletic enough to keep up with most tight ends, but is not an elite pass defender.  The young backer sheds blockers quickly, stepping up into the play instead of around, and is very useful applying inside pressure with a strong pass rush up the middle when called upon.  Worrilow is the leader of this defense. Read More »

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