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In my weekly column, we take a long look at impact fantasy football rookies.  I compare their performance to date against my original expectations of them.  Let’s continue this 2014 version of the series by looking at one of the best quarterbacksderekcarr in the 2014 NFL Draft, Derek Carr.  I will look at some of his college production against his performance versus Kansas City to dissect his dynasty value.

These are my thoughts after watching him in college:  The young leader makes quick decisions with a strong-am but looked even better with the efforts of his impressive receiver, Davante Adams.  Carr has good ball placement, is mobile in the pocket avoiding pressure, and takes what the defense gives him by reading their coverage well.  Carr has good footwork, steps up on his passes to see the entire field well. He tends to go to the open receiver running underneath instead of pressing the ball down the field.   The signal caller has the necessary arm strength to make all the throws and plays like a leader out there.  Read More »

In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date on their fantasy football teams. Some players may be available on your waiver jreedwire, some may be available via a cheap or moderate trade. Acquiring or not acquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.  This week I take a look at two young Washington skill players in Robert Griffin III and Jordan Reed.

QB-Robert Griffin III, WASH- I will refer to him as RG3 for the rest of the article for simplicity’s sake.  What a difference a year makes, when you look back to the beginning of 2013, the entire football world brimmed with excitement about the super athletic playmaker.  Now the realities of the 2014 season have set in, RG3 does not offer the same wonderment, in fact it might be better described as fear and loathing.  The third year quarterback started off the game pressured by the Bucs defense.  His first pass got batted in the air for an interception.  He was late on the throw and did not set his feet before releasing the ball.  A series later, RG3 didn’t see a linebacker looming underneath a short route, the ball got knocked into a Tampa corner’s arms for a short touchdown return. Read More »

In fantasy football, there are some new trends that I enjoy writing about: dynasty leagues, and individual defensive player leagues.  This weekly column will combine two of those by discussing two jjenkinsyoung IDPs.  I will give my scouting thoughts on how they played a particular week.  Today I will be discussing two young linebackers Jelani Jenkins and Preston Brown.

LB-Jelani Jenkins, MIA- The second year linebacker rose to the top of the Miami depth chart through solid dependable play.  Where he plays depends on situation, Jenkins lines up a lot as an inside backer on short yardage plays and as an outside backer in long down and distances.  He won’t wow you with his superior athleticism.  Instead the backer is a good open field tackler who reads plays quickly, flows laterally well, and can shed blockers using a solid base and good leverage.  Jenkins is fairly average against the run, as he mostly plays clean up by hitting the ball carrier once another defender slows them down.  Read More »

In my weekly column, we take a long look at impact fantasy football rookies.  I compare their performance to date against my original expectations of them.  Let’s continue this 2014 version of samwatkinsthe series by looking at one of the best receivers in the 2014 NFL Draft, Sammy Watkins.  I will look at some of his college production against his performance versus the Dolphins to dissect his dynasty value.

These are my thoughts after watching him in college: He has everything you wants in a receiver: hands, contorts himself to find the ball, great after the catch, skies to get the ball, creating space, and gets off the line with little issues.  Of course, in college there were not many corners that played with the physicality to match Watkins.  The Clemson receiver got used early and often mostly running short routes and bubble screens, but played big with his great athleticism and the best catch radius of his class. His usage in the screen game took the place of an active running game.  With a strong armed quarterback in Tajh Boyd, they built the chemistry for him to run under a lot of passing in stride for a lot of 50+ yard touchdowns.  I found him to be simply the best play maker in his class. Watkins is not a huge physical receiver, but he has enough quick twitch moves to separate from most NFL coverage.  In the right pass first offense, the young receiver could average 80+ catches, 1200 yards, and 7-9 touchdowns per season. Read More »

In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date on their fantasy football teams. Some players may be available on your waiver wire, some may be available via a cheap or kwrightmoderate trade. Acquiring or not acquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.  This week I take a look at two Titans receivers in Justin Hunter and Kendall Wright.

WR-Justin Hunter, TEN- This second year receiver only received two targets this week against the Ravens.  There seems to be little wrong with his technique as he gets off the line quickly when he is going out on a pass pattern or blocking in the run game.  The wide out can seal off his defender when run blocking.  Hunter spent most of the time split out wide on the single receiver side.  He has good balance, adjusts well to the ball in the air, and can catch the ball at its highest point with his fingertips.  Read More »

In fantasy football, there are some new trends that I enjoy writing about: dynasty leagues, and individual defensive player leagues.  This weekly column will combine two of those by discussing two young IDPs.  I will give my scouting thoughts lamuron how they played a particular week.  Today I will be discussing two young linebackers Christian Kirksey and Emmanuel Lamur.

LB-Christian Kirksey, CLE- The rookie linebacker is very athletic which you can see as he quickly flies to the ball on most passing plays.  The Browns use him very differently than they do fellow backer Craig Robertson, whom he usually replaces.  Kirksey sometimes plays bracket coverage on wide receivers with a safety or simply splits out wide against slot receivers or tight ends.  He occasionally rushes the passer from the outside and got good pressure that resulted in Andy Dalton stepping up right into a defensive lineman’s grasp for a sack. Read More »

In my weekly column, we take a long look at impact fantasy football rookies.  I compare their performance to date against my original expectations of them.  Let’s continue this 2014 version of the series by looking at one of the most biggest, jhillathletic backs in the last five years in Jeremy Hill.  I will look at some of his college production against his performance versus the Browns to dissect his dynasty value.

These are my thoughts after watching him in college:   This powerful, downhill runner is an explosive athlete with good burst and acceleration.   His clear weakness is while he can read blockers near the line of scrimmage, the runner cannot see more than five to ten yards down the field.  This impedes the back from getting to the second level if his offensive line doesn’t get a hat on a hat.

Hill has decent balance, but still runs a little too tall.  To become a better inside runner, the back must use his pads to deliver punishment, not the other way around.  He has a tendency to let defenders into his body this causes him to slow down which gets him tackled too soon.  This is an issue for most backs 6′ 2″ or taller.  Hill runs like a battering ram keeping his feet churning until the play is over, constantly falling forward for extra yardage.  He enjoys punishing defenders with a nice stiff-arms and high knees making sure they are carrying his weight.   There isn’t much dancing to him as he will take what yardage is available. Read More »

In fantasy football, there are some new trends that I enjoy writing about: dynasty leagues, and individual defensive player leagues.  This weekly column will combine two of those by discussing two young IDPs.  I will give my scouting thoughts telvinon how they played a particular week.  Today I will be discussing the two young Jacksonville linebackers James Thomas and Telvin Smith.

LB-James Thomas, JAX- I am breaking my usual rookie to three years in the NFL clause with Thomas, because he did not play a snap in the NFL during his rookie season.  In fact prior to this season, the fourth year linebacker accumulated statistics in 13 out of 48 possible games.  The injury to stalwart Paul Posluszny opened up the door for this defensive outburst. He is a versatile linebacker who plays on the outside on normal down and distance, but lines up as an inside backer on passing downs.  Thomas does a good job reading the quarterback’s eyes to get an idea of where he is going with the ball on passing downs and breaks quickly on the ball with good lateral agility.  He steps up to attack the blocker on running plays, but doesn’t always show the physicality in shedding blockers.  Read More »

In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date on their fantasy football teams. Some players may be available on your waiver wire, some may be available via a cheap or cadetmoderate trade. Acquiring or not acquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.  This week I take a look at New Orleans reserve running back Travaris Cadet and Dallas wide receiver Terrance Williams.

RB-Travaris Cadet, NO- The best way to describe the third year back is that he is an offensive weapon.  Although Cadet has not been used much in the Saints offense for the past three years, the touches he could have received went to better athletes such as Darren Sproles or Pierre Thomas.  Due to the departure of Sproles, the injuries to Thomas and Khiry Robinson, the third year back got thrust into the New Orleans game plan.  He is mostly used as a kickoff returner and third down/change of pace back.  The back is not an effective inside runner and usually bounces any carries he gets outside the tackle.  Cadet is most dangerous in space because he has a nice stutter step that puts defenders on their heals and can make them miss. Read More »

In my weekly column, we take a long look at impact fantasy football rookies.  I compare their performance to date against my original expectations of them.  Let’s continue this 2014 version of the series by looking at one of the most widely a-robdisputed rookie wide receivers in Allen Robinson.  I will look at some of his college production against his performance versus the Bengals to dissect his dynasty value.

These are my thoughts after watching him in college: The first thing I noticed is that if Robinson isn’t the primary target  he loses interest quickly and is not very effective as a run blocker.  His stance on the line of scrimmage tended to let his coverage know his route before he ran it.  The wide out has to get off the line of scrimmage the same way, every time.  He looks fantastic when his quarterback can find him in stride, but that did not happen often many times due to the signal caller play.  To make matters worse, Robinson did a lot of body catching and showed lapses of concentration. The wide out would make an amazing catch on one play, and then fight his hands an easy pass on the very next play. Read More »

In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date on their fantasy football teams. Some players may be available on your waiver wire, some may be available via a cheap or riddickmoderate trade. Acquiring or not acquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.  This week I take a look at two young Lions skilled players: Theo Riddick and Corey Fuller.

RB-Theo Riddick, DET- The second year back’s usage is increasing each week that he is healthy and Reggie Bush is not.  He started the game over Joique Bell which was a little surprising.  At first blush, the back has quick feet, nice wiggle, and good balance that make him quite dangerous in space.  Between the tackles is a different matter as Riddick finished with three carries for five yards on the ground (he even got a few goal line carries over Bell).  Once the Lions fell behind by three touchdowns, the second year playmaker was in his element. The back got used as a receiver/back playing for the Fighting Irish, so he is quite accustomed to the role. Read More »

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