Skip navigation

In fantasy football, there are some new trends that I enjoy writing about: dynasty leagues, and individual defensive player leagues.  This weekly column will combine two of those by discussing two dbucyoung IDPs.  I will give my scouting thoughts on how they played a particular week.  Today I will be discussing Arizona rookie safety Deone Bucannon and third year Denver linebacker Brandon Marshall.

 S-Deone Bucannon, ARZ- The rookie defender plays a hybrid linebacker/safety position which keeps him in position to defend the run and the pass equally well.  He drops back into coverage quickly, has good vision and anticipation to discern where the play is going.  Bucannon moves well laterally, showing no wasted movement getting to the ball carrier.  There were a few times he dropped back deep into coverage, but he is better taking on athletic tight ends near the line of scrimmage.  The young safety is a solid, punishing tackler who limits their yards after the catch.  Bucannon has the speed and quickness to hang in coverage with slot receivers and running backs too.  He reads the quarterbacks eyes well. Read More »

In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date on their fantasy football teams. Some players may be available on your waiver tavonwire, some may be available via a cheap or moderate trade. Acquiring or not acquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.  This week I take a look at jack of all trades the Rams Tavon Austin and newly second string Bengals runner Gio Bernard.

WR-Tavon Austin, STL- Last year’s eighth pick overall in the NFL draft has surely been a disappointment to the Rams and dynasty football owners alike.  The problem with players like this is they flash superior athleticism every so often which makes you forget how inconsistent they are.  Austin had scored a touchdown in three straight games before the Cardinals game on Thursday Night Football.  This second year receiver, not his former college teammate Stedman Bailey, started the game with Kenny Britt.  He is a very versatile player with more return yardage than either rushing or receiving.  The unique thing is the athlete has close to the same amount of yards and touches regardless if he gets handed the ball or thrown it.  This keeps the defenses and fantasy owners guessing. Read More »

In my weekly column, we take a long look at impact fantasy football rookies.  I compare their performance to date against my original expectations of them.  Let’s continue this 2014 version of JBthe series by looking at one of the surprising wide receivers, John Brown.  I will look at some of his college production against his performance versus St. Louis to discern his dynasty value.

This is what I glimpsed from his college film:  The young wide out has great initial burst aka acceleration and can start/stop quickly without losing steps to gear up or down (he possesses 4.34 40 speed that he showed off at the NFL Combine).  Brown runs crisp, clean routes and could not be covered in one on one situations.  He uses precise footwork and is a good technician making every route look the same off the line.  The receiver has good downfield vision that he used well as a returner. Read More »

In fantasy football, there are some new trends that I enjoy writing about: dynasty leagues, and individual defensive player leagues.  This weekly column will combine two of those by discussing two hitchyoung IDPs.  I will give my scouting thoughts on how they played a particular week.  Today I will be discussing Dallas rookie linebacker Anthony Hitchens and St Louis rookie corner back EJ Gaines.

LB-Anthony Hitchens, DAL- The rookie inside linebacker moves quickly around the gridiron.  He has good vision and anticipation, but has a bad tendency to over pursue at times forcing himself out of the play. Hitchens rushed the passer through the middle, but did not get much penetration past the line of scrimmage.   On running plays, he seemed to be happiest trailing the play instead of breaking on the ball.  Hitchens needs to do a better good of stepping into blockers and shedding them, instead of trying to run around them. The backer is a solid tackler though, trying to make the play by controlling the ball carrier’s hips or diving and wrapping up their ankles. Read More »

In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date on their fantasy football teams. Some players may be available on your waiver marqueswire, some may be available via a cheap or moderate trade. Acquiring or not acquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.  This week I take a look at two up and coming receivers in the Bears Marques Wilson and the Rams Stedman Bailey.

WR-Marques Wilson, CHI- This second year receiver is starting to get his NFL bearings after missing the majority of his first two NFL seasons. Early summer reports had him training along Brandon Marshall and Alshon Jeffery to work on his craft.  In the game against the Cowboys, he had the most yards and targets since he came off the injured reserve (broken collarbone) in Week 11.  Sure, his two catches for 19 yards alone is not impressive, but two of those missed targets were deep targets that the wide out drew pass interference penalties on. Read More »

In my weekly column, we take a long look at impact fantasy football rookies.  I compare their performance to date against my original expectations of them.  Let’s continue this 2014 version of trethe series by looking at running back Tre Mason.  I will look at some of his college production against his performance versus Washington to discern his dynasty value.

Here are my thoughts after watching him in college:  The young back is very sudden and explosive with impressive foot speed.  Mason is lacking in leg power/strength, so he takes what the defense allows him, instead of imposing his will.  The runner uses good leverage getting small and darting through minute creases. He has a great sense of balance and falls forward gaining additional yardage by always keeping his feet chopping. One of his best attributes is his vision which allows him to find the best angles.  Mason has a fantastic jump cut which helps him separate from defenders with ease. Read More »

 

In fantasy football, there are some new trends that I enjoy writing about: dynasty leagues, and individual defensive player leagues.  This weekly column will combine two of those by discussing two cborlandyoung IDPs.  I will give my scouting thoughts on how they played a particular week.  Today I will be discussing linebackers Chris Borland and Keenan Robinson.

LB-Chris Borland, SF- This rookie was one of the most heralded linebackers coming out in the 2014 Draft until he landed by the bay.  The 49ers top two linebackers, Patrick Willis and Navarro Bowman, appeared to be cemented as starters for years to come.  Fate didn’t exactly turn out that way with Borland being the only healthy one of the three backers so far this season.

The young linebacker certainly turned heads as a Wisconsin Badger and made quite an impression during the Senior Bowl practices in my eyes.  Yes, Borland is an undersized backer standing only 5’11”, but his small compact body delivers quick striking hits.  He has great vision finding the ball carrier and makes a point to step into blockers to knock them off-balance and shed them quickly.  The linebacker is a good student of the game, because he watches the quarterback’s eyes and anticipates where the play is going, getting there sometimes before the offense.  Read More »

In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date on their fantasy football teams. Some players may be available on your waiver cmikewire, some may be available via a cheap or moderate trade. Acquiring or not acquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.  This week I take a look at the two young Seahawks running backs: Robert Turbin and Christine Michael.  These two are particularly interesting considering reports are that Seattle will walk away from all-pro  runner Marshawn Lynch after this season.

RB-Robert Turbin, SEA- This third year back is more of a change of pace back, than a lead back.  He didn’t get on the field until near the end of the first quarter, but made a huge impact right away.  After lining up beside Russell Wilson in the shotgun formation, he ran a short wheel route with no one in coverage and hugged the sidelines screaming down the field for the only touchdown of the night.  Turbin caught the ball in stride with soft hands, showing good burst and vision on the way to the end zone.  Lynch had been split out wide on that play confusing the defensive coverage. Read More »

In my weekly column, we take a long look at impact fantasy football rookies.  I compare their performance to date against my original expectations of them.  Let’s continue this 2014 version of jmatthewsthe series by looking at one of the best receivers in the 2014 NFL Draft class, Jordan Matthews.  I will look at some of his college production against his performance versus Dallas to discern his dynasty value.

Here are my thoughts after watching three games of his college play: At first glance, Matthews is a physical specimen at 6’ 2” 212 lbs., but plays larger than that.  The receiver was the first player ever to ask for tape of his opponents after his Senior Bowl invite.  It’s his work ethic and competitive nature that separates the wide out from the other talented receivers in his class, not his famous cousin Jerry Rice. Read More »

In fantasy football, there are some new trends that I enjoy writing about: dynasty leagues, and individual defensive player leagues.  This weekly column will combine two of those by discussing two parkeryoung IDPs.  I will give my scouting thoughts on how they played a particular week.  Today I will be discussing Kansas City cornerback Ron Parker and Tennessee linebacker Avery Williamson.

CB-Ron Parker, KC- The former safety plays with tight physical coverage the majority of the time he is on the field.  Technically he is a fourth year player who spent time with the Raiders and Seahawks before settling in the starting lineup for the Chiefs.  He gets his hands all over the receivers within the first five yards.  There are times the defensive back likes to gamble with slower receivers, like Vincent Brown.  When he misjudged Brown’s quick area burst, Parker gave up a 15 yard gain.  This did not cause him to doubt himself as he continued to take those kind of chances the entire night.  You need to be mentally tough and a bit crazy to play on an island in the NFL.  The corner is a solid tackler, who plays good run support and is not afraid to throw a shoulder to knock the runner down. Read More »

In this weekly column, I typically explore some young players who haven’t made much of a consistent impact to date on their fantasy football teams. Some players may be available on your waiver lmurrwire, some may be available via a cheap or moderate trade. Acquiring or not acquiring one of these players could decide how well your dynasty or keeper team does for the next few years.  This week I take a look at two young running backs, Kansas City’s Knile Davis and Oakland’s Latavius Murray.

RB-Knile Davis,KC- This second year running back overcame several knee surgeries from his time in college to become one of the most important handcuffs for fantasy owners.  When Jamaal Charles is fully healthy, Davis plays mostly as a kickoff return specialist and a change of pace back.  He has quick feet, but dances a bit too much.  The young runner does not have the elusiveness that Charles possesses and usually has to lower his shoulders, using his low center of gravity, then power thru tackles instead of trying to avoid them. Read More »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,417 other followers