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Tag Archives: Tevin Coleman

 

There is something great about the NFL Draft.  Optimism is in the air for everyone as it represents a new beginning.  This is even more true with your dynasty squad especially if you are coming off a rough season.  After the rookie draft, you AndrewMiley_Twitterhave new exciting players, but now the draft and perhaps excitement are over.  Many owners stop visiting their league site for a while, go on that vacation, perhaps read a few articles here and there, and then log in right before Labor Day.  I’m not saying don’t go on vacation for a week or two, just don’t take a summer hiatus from your league(s).

Keep up with the news.

Mario Williams and Jerry Hughes play outside linebacker and not defensive ends in the new Rex Ryan scheme, that could be major news in leagues where owners have to scramble for defensive linemen.  Devonta Freeman might be a better fit for the Falcons running game than rookie Tevin Coleman.  This is the time to keep track of the little things, because you never know when a little crumb from the local media will pay off big.

Know your waivers.

I’m in seven leagues right now and every week I go thru the available players for every league.  On leagues that use the myfantasyleague.com site, there is a feature called the “my draft list” that you get to from the “For Owners” tab.  I sort the available players first by position and then by team to be thorough and add all interesting free agents.  This list keeps all of the free agents organized at a moments notice.  I still go low tech as well with my index cards.  When I tell my friends this, they say “why bother”, because I want to know who is available at any time.  If you want to make a trade, the knowledge that a replacement level player is available can reduce the risks you take. Read More »

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Many of us dynasty diehards are in the middle of rookie drafts or we have just completed them, here is a weekly article about the trends that are occurring on myfantasyleague.com fantasy football tjyeldrookie drafts.  This the second part of a three-part series, because most leagues complete their rookie drafts before those long summer days that get filled with vacations, outside chores and activities.  As always, my thoughts get based on dynasty PPR leagues with sacks being worth 2.5 times that a tackle is worth.

 Just right: TJ Yeldon, Jacksonville running back (average draft spot 1.06)

Despite what some fantasy pundits believe, this is still a running back centric game.  It is a huge shame that most runners have such a limited shelf life.  Yeldon has little competition for playing time, is a red zone threat,  and just as active in the passing game.  I took him at the 1.05 in a dynasty league where I desperately needed RB talent.
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Many of us dynasty diehards are in the middle of rookie drafts or we have just completed them, I wanted to create a weekly article about the trends that are occurring on myfantasyleague.com jaelenstfantasy football rookie drafts.  This will be a three-part series, because most leagues complete their rookie drafts before those long summer days that get filled with vacations, outside chores and activities.  As always, my thoughts get based on dynasty PPR leagues with sacks being worth 2.5 times that a tackle is worth.

Undervalued: Todd Gurley, St. Louis running back (average draft spot 1.04)

While Gurley is overcoming a serious knee injury, he still is the best runner the NFL has seen since Adrian Peterson.  In a rookie draft where I hold the 1.01, Gurley is my selection. Sure this is my choice on a team that I took over.   My roster needs a lot of work and I don’t need to count on him from day one.  I can understand him going after Amari Cooper, but not Melvin Gordon or Kevin White. Read More »

My review of the NFL Draft continues with my dynasty fantasy rankings of the first year running backs.  I am trying to consider their value two to four years down the road along with what they couldmel do year one.  Here are my thoughts:

1) Todd Gurley, St. Louis

He is the most explosive, physical runner in his class.  His knee issue might be a concern, but if you are a non-contending team, this should be your selection.  Gurley could sit out the first six games of the season, then again ask yourself, will it matter in a year?

2) Melvin Gordon, San Diego

Former Wisconsin running backs are usually inflated due to their dominant offensive lines.  Gordon is more explosive than most, has good foot speed, and can catch the ball out of the backfield.  This runner will start from day one and not look back. Read More »

After the second day of the NFL Draft, fantasy dynasty owners now have more questions than answers concerning the Titans receiving corps, and the Lions and Browns running back roles.  I will maxxtake a quick review of what occurred and how it looks like it will affect your dynasty teams.  Players got listed in the order of selection in the NFL Draft:

2nd round

S Landon Collins, NYG

This physical player will be an instant impact player as the starter day one of mini-camps.  Collins should see plenty of tackle opportunities in the running and passing games with a not so impressive linebacker corps.

RB TJ Yeldon, Jacksonville

He is a quick footed runner, who can be a three down back for the Jaguars.  The back has good balance, sees the field well, moves great laterally, and has a nose for the end zone. Read More »

One of the most intriguing running backs in the 2015 draft class is Indiana’s top rusher Tevin Coleman.  Unfortunately, he suffered a minor injury right before the Combine and did not participate in tcolemanany drills.  To get a better idea of skills this talented runner brings to the next level, I watched four of his games against Indiana State, Ohio State, Iowa, and my alma mater Bowling Green.  Here is what I saw:

RB Tevin Coleman, Indiana 5′ 11″ 206 lbs.

Cons: For a running back, Coleman has very small legs.  This does not seem to affect him while running between the tackles, but does limit him in short yardage and goal line situations.  Another area that hinders Coleman is that he is not much of a pass blocker.  The runner does not get low or square his shoulders before meeting the defender trying to get to the quarterback.  On every play I saw, he would either get knocked back or got avoided by the blitzer.  This would limit him to a two down role in the NFL if he cannot protect the signal caller.  When used as a receiver, Coleman caught the ball with his body on over half of his receptions.  He needed to slow down to catch the ball, instead of making the reception in stride. Read More »