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Tag Archives: Mario Edwards

The amazing time for dynasty fantasy football continues.  We are getting some rookie practice reports; all kinds of fantasy football drafts are underway which gives everyone a chance to put their mallettmoney where their mouth is in respect to player evaluation and strategy.  I joined a start-up league run by my buddy Stan Hyatt.  It is a 12 teamer with 40 regular roster spots and five taxi squad spots (rookies only).  The lineups are as follows: 1 QB, 2-3 RBs, 2-5 WRs, 1-3 TEs (need eight combined players out of RB/WR/TE spots), 1 K and on the defensive side 3-4 LBs, 3-4 DBs, 2-3 DLs with ten total defensive starters.  It is PPR scoring for all positions, tackle heavy IDP scoring, 6 points for every touchdown, .1 points per 1 yard of offense (rushing and receiving), and .05 per yard of passing and/or returns.  I was lucky enough to end up with my favorite roster spot, 10th overall in a straight snake format.  You can find the league here: http://football24.myfantasyleague.com/2015/options?L=78307&O=17

31.06 QB Ryan Mallett, Texans

He could be the starting quarterback for the Texans with his strong arm and limited pocket agility.  Mallett hasn’t exactly had the chance to play much sitting behind Tom Brady and then getting hurt in his second game starting last season.  The quarterback gets the strong running game of Arian Foster to run interference while throwing to some talented receivers in DeAndre Hopkins, Jaelen Strong, and Cecil ShortsRead More »

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Now onto discussing the 2015 Draft defensive linemen that usually provide the constant pass rush and get to occupy blockers to keep their linebacker corps clean.  As a general rule, it is better to OOgrab defensive linemen that play in 4-3 schemes (JJ Watt is the exception).  The reason is that in a 4-3 defense, the d-line will face less double teams and get the opportunity to stunt more (change gaps to cause confusion on the offensive line) giving them more shots at the quarterback and ball carriers.  Here are my thoughts on these rookie defenders:

1)  Vic Beasley, Atlanta

Right now he is a defensive end, tomorrow he could be a linebacker.  Beasley creates pressure well as a pass rusher, but needs some work against the run.  The defender is full of energy/talent and should raise the entire Falcons defense a notch. Read More »

Welcome to Day Three in Indianapolis.  This is usually my favorite day of the combine with huge men looking more athletic than they should.   The defensive linemen as a whole impressed, while thescoutingcombine linebackers were not as crisp as they had been in years past.  Here are some thoughts on players that stood out today:

DT/DE Arik Armstead, Oregon

He was a big, muscular monster.  The defender showed good balance and some quickness, but definitely belongs on the defensive line.

DE/LB Vic Beasley, Clemson

If the combine needed to have a winner for the day, it would be Beasley.  This muscular, quick twitched athlete ran an impressive 4.53 forty yard dash.  He was explosive with no wasted motion changing directions effortlessly (an impressive three cone drill time of 6.91), while showing off quick, powerful striking hands.  Beasley also looked nature dropping back into coverage. Read More »

This is the time of the fantasy season  in dynasty leagues when the good owners are trying to find ways to fortify their teams.  One of the best ways to do that is by looking to the college players that m&mmight make the move to the NFL this spring.  Here are more of the players that stood out with their bowl game play.  This is by no means an exhaustive list, rather a starting point for the 2015 NFL Draft and your own rookie fantasy draft!  I listed these players alphabetically:

DT: Carl Davis, Iowa

This is a bad man who demands two blockers on almost every play.  He gets great initial pressure right off the snap of the ball.  Davis knocked a guard back into the ball carrier to knock both offensive players on their butts and the next play stood up a guard while reaching out with one arm tackling the running back.  The problem is Davis moves like an alligator, full speed straight ahead with a lot of power and determination.  However, when you make him move laterally, he loses a lot of steam and power. Read More »