Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Marcus Peters

Here is my final installment of rookie positional breakdowns, the defensive backs.  Like much of the other defenders, scheme plays a huge impact.  Strong safeties, in general, get more tackle landoncopportunities because they play closer to the line.  Rookie corner backs that play opposite top-tier teammates tend to receiver more targets which leads to more impactful chances to make tackles, breakup passes, and catch interceptions aka “the rookie corner rule”.  Here is a quick rundown of my top six defensive backs:

1. S Landon Collins, Giants

All the Giants starting safeties have left the organization.  This hard-hitting safety plays the run well and can do enough damage in pass coverage.  The New York linebacker corps is not that impressive, so he might lead his team in tackles. Read More »

Advertisements

Now that all pro days are in the books and I’ve gotten the chance to watch everyone on the list.  Here is this quick updated list with my thoughts of this dynasty fantasy football draft class.  These rankings are very fluid and will get adjusted after the NFL Draft is overDraft. Any rankings in italics are upgrades.

Quarterbacks

1. Jameis Winston, Florida State

2. Marcus Mariota, Oregon

3. Brett Hundley, UCLA

4. Bryce Petty, Baylor

5. Garrett Grayson, Colorado State

6. Shane Carden, East Carolina

Running backs

1. Todd Gurley, Georgia

2. Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin Read More »

The 2015 NFL Draft has a lot of unique defenders that can play multiple positions and the next one I want to discuss is Utah’s defensive back Eric Rowe.  He played his first three seasons as a safety eroweand then switched to corner back his senior season.  While watching him, one can see that the defender never left his physical style behind when he moved to corner.  I reviewed four of his games against Michigan, Washington State, UCLA, and Arizona to get a better feel for what the young man brings to the next level.  Here is what I saw:

CB/S Eric Rowe, Utah 6’ 1” 205 lbs.

Cons:  The defender still moves more like a safety than a corner.  What I mean by that is he shows stiff hips changing directions (this is very evident as it leaves him open to get beat deep when Rowe gets forced to open himself up quickly).  The corner gets very handsy in coverage and it will depend on the officiating staff to decide if penalties will get called on him from game to game.  He sometimes tackles too high and can get off-balance trying to shoulder block ball carriers down, instead of wrapping up. Rowe shows a tendency to play the man and not the ball, so if a receiver with great rapport with his quarterback might take him by surprise if he is looking for a sign that the ball is arriving. Read More »

This year’s draft is full of question marks and no one has as many as Washington corner back Marcus Peters.  He got dismissed from the team during the 2014 season, but allowed to practice with hismarcusp former teammates on campus, showing some repentance and acceptance with his former college coaching staff.  I reviewed six of his games against Hawaii, Eastern Washington, Oregon, Colorado, Stanford, and Oregon State to get a better idea of the skills he will bring to the next level.  Here is what I saw:

CB Marcus Peters, Washington 6’ 197 lbs.

Cons:  Combine watchers will be the first to report the corner only ran a 4.53 forty yard dash.  There are plenty of NFL coverage defensive backs that do well with this kind of speed; however his technique will need to be almost Richard Sherman good to be an outstanding starting defensive back. The problem is he relies on his athleticism more than he is a student of the game.  His effort varies from play to play as does his excitement.  When Peters is in the zone he is outstanding, but he can get too fired up and then thrown out of a game or have multiple penalties hurting his team.  There were too many times that he ended up flat on his back in run support, although Peters managed to make a few tackles from there.  The corner can get very aggressive in coverage, either getting too handsy or trying to jump routes.  A seasoned quarterback will exploit those tendencies often, if these are not curtailed.  Read More »

Now that some pro days occurred and I’ve gotten the chance to watch more film.  Here is a quick updated list with my thoughts of this dynasty fantasy football draft class.  These rankings are very fluid and will get adjustedDraft again before April 30th. Any rankings in italics are upgrades.

Quarterbacks

1. Jameis Winston, Florida State

2. Marcus Mariota, Oregon

3. Brett Hundley, UCLA

4. Bryce Petty, Baylor

5. Garrett Grayson, Colorado State

6. Shane Carden, East Carolina

Running backs

1. Todd Gurley, Georgia

2. Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin Read More »

It’s the final day in Indianapolis.  NFL Network coverage starts to lag a little, because more people tune in for Rich Eisen’s forty time than they do to watch the defensive backs.  This is definitely the scoutingcombineday for hardcore dynasty owners and fans of Deon Sanders.  Here are some quick observations of mine:

CB Jalen Collins, LSU

The corner ran a respectable 4.48 forty.  He has big legs, long arms, and quick feet.  Collins used good back pedal, loose hips while showing off his soft hands in the gauntlet drill.  Read More »

Now that the NFL Combine is over, the fantasy community is all about the rankings.  Here is a quick list with my initial thoughts of this dynasty fantasy football draft class.  My rankings are very fluid and could change Draftdramatically before April 30th.  This is a minimalist list that will get more meat on it in later versions.

Quarterbacks

1. Jameis Winston, Florida State

2. Marcus Mariota, Oregon Read More »