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Tag Archives: Leonard Williams

This is an amazing time for dynasty fantasy football.  We are beginning to get some rookie practice reports; all kinds of fantasy football drafts are underway which gives everyone a chance to put their ebronmoney where their mouth is in respect to player evaluation and strategy.  I joined a start-up league run by my buddy Stan Hyatt.  It is a 12 teamer with 40 regular roster spots and five taxi squad spots (rookies only).  The lineups are as follows: 1 QB, 2-3 RBs, 2-5 WRs, 1-3 TEs (need eight combined players out of RB/WR/TE spots), 1 K and on the defensive side 3-4 LBs, 3-4 DBs, 2-3 DLs with ten total defensive starters.  It is PPR scoring for all positions, tackle heavy IDP scoring, 6 points for every touchdown, .1 points per 1 yard of offense (rushing and receiving), and .05 per yard of passing and/or returns.  I was lucky enough to end up with my favorite roster spot, 10th overall in a straight snake format.  You can find the league here: http://football24.myfantasyleague.com/2015/options?L=78307&O=17

11.04 TE Eric Ebron, Lions

This ultra-athletic tight end had a slow first year in the league.  Ebron was the 13th tight end taken and is worth the pick here with upside alone.  I’m a strong believer in taking chances on players that play on good offenses in dynasty startups as he may never come at a cheaper price. Read More »

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Now onto discussing the 2015 Draft defensive linemen that usually provide the constant pass rush and get to occupy blockers to keep their linebacker corps clean.  As a general rule, it is better to OOgrab defensive linemen that play in 4-3 schemes (JJ Watt is the exception).  The reason is that in a 4-3 defense, the d-line will face less double teams and get the opportunity to stunt more (change gaps to cause confusion on the offensive line) giving them more shots at the quarterback and ball carriers.  Here are my thoughts on these rookie defenders:

1)  Vic Beasley, Atlanta

Right now he is a defensive end, tomorrow he could be a linebacker.  Beasley creates pressure well as a pass rusher, but needs some work against the run.  The defender is full of energy/talent and should raise the entire Falcons defense a notch. Read More »

With the first day of the NFL Draft completed, there are a few complicated positional situations, the Jets defensive front three, the Rams backfield, and the Colts receiving corps.  Here are some of Draftmy quick observations after five hours of sleep, done in order of selection:

QB Jameis Winston, Tampa Bay

The local signal caller gets a great target situation with Vincent Jackson, Mike Evans, Austin Seferian-Jenkins, and Doug Martin/Charles Sims.  The problem is their offensive line situation is not in the best shape.  With the Bucs defense a bit on the weak side, there should be plenty of opportunities for offensive production for Winston.  He is in a great situation to produce from year one on.

QB Marcus Mariota, Tennessee

The Titans went with the only other feasible starting quarterback from day one.  Ken Whisenhunt has gotten the most from his quarterbacks, so this should be no different.  Delanie Walker and Kendall Wright should see an immediate uptick to their fantasy value.  The mobile Mariota might help create space for second year back Bishop Sankey.  I’m not as enthusiastic about his situation for his first two seasons. Read More »

Now that all pro days are in the books and I’ve gotten the chance to watch everyone on the list.  Here is this quick updated list with my thoughts of this dynasty fantasy football draft class.  These rankings are very fluid and will get adjusted after the NFL Draft is overDraft. Any rankings in italics are upgrades.

Quarterbacks

1. Jameis Winston, Florida State

2. Marcus Mariota, Oregon

3. Brett Hundley, UCLA

4. Bryce Petty, Baylor

5. Garrett Grayson, Colorado State

6. Shane Carden, East Carolina

Running backs

1. Todd Gurley, Georgia

2. Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin Read More »

Now that some pro days occurred and I’ve gotten the chance to watch more film.  Here is a quick updated list with my thoughts of this dynasty fantasy football draft class.  These rankings are very fluid and will get adjustedDraft again before April 30th. Any rankings in italics are upgrades.

Quarterbacks

1. Jameis Winston, Florida State

2. Marcus Mariota, Oregon

3. Brett Hundley, UCLA

4. Bryce Petty, Baylor

5. Garrett Grayson, Colorado State

6. Shane Carden, East Carolina

Running backs

1. Todd Gurley, Georgia

2. Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin Read More »

 

This year’s draft is full of pass rushers.  Outside of the top six of Vic Beasley, Shane Ray, Dante Fowler, Bud Dupree, Randy Gregory, and Leonard Williams, there is a lot of debate who should be eliharoldnext.  One of the names that get mentioned is Virginia’s Eli Harold.  He is a bit undersized for a typical defensive end role, but has some good tape out there.  I reviewed five of his games against UCLA, Louisville, Pittsburgh, Miami, and Maryland to get a better idea of what he can bring to the NFL.  Here is what I saw:

OLB/DE Eli Harold, Virginia 6’ 3” 248 lbs.

Cons: The defender does not have any specialized skills in trying to get to the quarterback.  Most pass rushers use spins, swim moves, dips, and bull rushers in some sort of concert to create separation between themselves and their blockers, not him.  Harold shoves and pushes with only a glimpse of a spin or swim move, despite having quick hands.  He tends to lunge and get off-balance, which makes it easier to get him on the ground or out of the way.  Too many times the defender let the offensive lineman into his body which makes him easy to pass or run block against.  Harold needs to use his punch more often and anchor himself forcing the ball back inside.  He also fell for a few too many fake handoffs from UCLA’s Brent Hundley; the first time understandable, but to fall for it multiple times… Read More »

For those fantasy leagues that use defensive linemen as a part of an IDP package, the 2015 NFL Draft will be an exciting time.  The only significant defender that will be a defensive lineman no matterleo what is the ultra-talented, Leonard Williams. The former USC playmaker can line up at defensive end or defensive tackle in a 4-3 scheme or anchor either defensive end spot in a 3-4 formation.  After hearing about what an amazing talent he was, I watched seven of his games against Fresno State, California, Nebraska, Arizona State, Utah, Notre Dame, and Arizona to decide for myself.  Here is what I found:

DE/DT Leonard Williams, USC 6’ 5” 302 lbs.

Cons: Despite being a fantastic, athletic man, Williams is still raw and needs to improve his technique, especially getting too high out of his stance while chasing down whoever has the pigskin.  He really needs to get better at the psychology of setting up moves in the first quarter that will free him up to make plays in the fourth.  There were a few times that emotions ran high with him and he got penalized on back to back plays.  The defender needs to keep in mind the phrase “the game is chess, not checkers.”  Once he gets the long game down, Williams will be downright scary. Read More »

Now that the NFL Combine is over, the fantasy community is all about the rankings.  Here is a quick list with my initial thoughts of this dynasty fantasy football draft class.  My rankings are very fluid and could change Draftdramatically before April 30th.  This is a minimalist list that will get more meat on it in later versions.

Quarterbacks

1. Jameis Winston, Florida State

2. Marcus Mariota, Oregon Read More »

It’s that time of year when I turn my focus to the college bowl games to gain insight. I will do my best to find some draft eligible players that could improve your dynasty teams. This article intends tokbell start conversations and encourage continued thought throughout the entire draft process. These are my observations based on the bowl games, unless otherwise indicated. There will be much more in-depth, thought-provoking discussions later in the offseason. I am listing these players alphabetically.

WR-Kenny Bell, Nebraska- Despite having a big head of hair, Bell is a smooth, fluid athlete that gets in and out of his breaks quickly.  He does a great job catching the ball in stride with his soft hands and runs crisp routes.  The receiver tracks the ball well in the air, gets separation and shields the pigskin from his defensive coverage.  Bell lines up all over the formation, and gets a clean release of the line using his hands and quick feet.  He knows where he is on the field at all times, toe-tapping near the sidelines showing good balance.  The wide out adjusted to the ball in the end zone getting his knee down to catch a touchdown.  Once Bell has the ball in his hands, he fights for extra yardage, not going down easily and uses a stiff-arm to get away from would-be tacklers.  As a run blocker, he could use some work, but he does get in front of his defender and sprung his running back for a touchdown in the red zone. Read More »